Halloween Day celebration

2
travel-tourism

Summary

Halloween Day is a special festival, celebrated every year on 31 October, and the tradition began with the ancient Celtic festival Samhain, on this day people wear ghost costumes.

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Halloween Day is a special festival, celebrated every year on 31 October, and the tradition began with the ancient Celtic festival Samhain, on this day people wear ghost costumes. Villagers welcome the souls of their loved ones by cleaning their graves and decorating their graves with marigolds and candles. Marigold and candles are visible as far as the eye can see. On that day the whole city lights up with candles. Families wear embroidered indigenous clothes for feasts, for which they cook the favorite food of their deceased relatives. It is said that the souls of the dead return to visit their homes during Halloween Day celebrations.

 

Adults and children celebrate this day by wearing scary clothes. However, today they dress up as popular celebrities, children’s show characters, princesses, superheroes, and more. Children wear clothes and go for a walk. They go door to door in their neighborhood and say “Trick or Treat!” Asking for treats like candy and snacks. According to tradition, if no feast is offered, they can trick the owners of the house. The traditional scary and modern fun sides of Halloween are seen today in the form of jack-o’-lanterns that people carve out of scary faces on pumpkins. Homeowners place jack-o’-lanterns in front of their homes to scare away evil spirits and welcome fraudsters. Other trendy fun activities depicting Halloween’s traditional past include watching horror movies and visiting haunted houses.

 

Why do we crave human faces on pumpkins?

In old times, individuals involved turnips as an image of Halloween. At the point when some Irish moved to America with their families, they observed that pumpkins were more promptly accessible there than turnips, so they subbed turnips for pumpkin. “Jack-o’- light” is of British beginning and traces all the way back to the seventeenth 100 years. It in a real sense signifies “man with the lamp” (night guardian). Over the long run, it became famous as a term for turnip light. In Britain, it was standard to convey jack-o’- lights house to house, asking for soul cakes at Hallowmas to address the spirits of the dead. As per legend, the jack-o’- light took its name from an Irish man known as Stingy Jack, who fooled Satan into promising that he wouldn’t need to get lost for his transgressions. At the point when Jack passed on, he discovered that he had been banned from paradise, so he went to the doors of agony to request his due.